Page 10, 11th March 1938

11th March 1938
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Page 10, 11th March 1938 — Catholics--True Internationalists
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Organisations: French Government
People: Charles V
Locations: Paris

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Catholics--True Internationalists

We Must Not Let Communists Get Away With Everything

Our New World Radio Feature Begins

Would the Radio offer the same opportunities and possibilities it does today, if Latin were still, as in the Middle Ages, the medium of communication between educated Europeans?

Not, if, as Charles V declared, "He who possesses five languages, possesses five souls." For to those who have lived in foreign lands, among different nations, the peculiar delight of radio transmission is precisely this: that it not only conjures up visions from afar, that it re-creates atmosphere but reveals soul to soul. In this lies the mysterious, spiritual power, the magic-and mission-of the wireless waves, tar surpassing that of the printed word. To allow this power then, to be debased for trivial, tedious, commonplace, not infrequently vulgar :entertainment is surely to incur a great responsibility before future generations, more especially in these days of high sounding "internationalism" which has become the watchword of those engaged in sinister subversive activities.

Catholic Position

Catholics look on indifferently? They who are in reality the only :rue internationalists and have been for the last two thousand years? Rather may they realise through the medium of the wireless as never before, that their spiritual home is not confined within the land of their birth but that it extends far across time and space, irrespective of race and tongue, to those lands where the Catholic faith set the standards of intellectual and social life long ago and still sets these standards, despite hostile or indifferent governments because the whole fabric of national life remains based on she rock of Christian tradition and principles.

How mortifying then to reflect that while the youth of a land we know to have been the stronghold of our faith through cen

tunics, are facing death and torture in defence of these principles, against those whom we may hear night after night, over the wireless waves, proclaim their determination to uproot the Christian principles from which we draw our very life. we are placidly content to have our hearts and minds dulled, by the meaningless sounds of barbaric dance bands!

Reflection on Us

What a reflection on our moral and ethical standards that while the voice of Mexico and of the Communist International for three hours of a night boasts of its work and progress, not only in distant parts of the globe but in our very midst, in our seemingly peaceful countryside, there cannot be found, apparently, in this great World-Empire, sufficient listeners to demand, for the youth of this land, broadcasts on our Christian aims and activities.

That there are avowedly similar governments who have solved the problem of how to satisfy every mode of political, religious

and irreligious opinion and tendency, is proved by the French Government stations' programmes, Radio Paris first and foremost among them.

What France Does There you may hear three times a day, not only the latest news but comments from every organ of the French and International Press, from the extreme right to the extreme left, then you may listen to the Voice of the C.G.T. with M. Jouheuse as spokesman explaining and defending the claims of the workers to he followed immediately, so as to ensure perfect impartiality, by an address from a member of the Employers' Federation (Patron et de France) expounding the opposite point of view.

Or again those interested in the activities of the rising generation may, in the biweekly Quart d'Leure des Mines listen not only to discussions among boy scouts and girl guides, to experiences of students in the youth hostels of various countries, but to the exchange of views before the microphone of "old comrades" (Au Aux Corn&taunts) and youths of today on war and its prevention.

An extremely interesting broadcast was that by members of youth associations, who spoke in turn on the magazines published by and for these associations, including every shade of opinion, from the Copain-Co-op, the Equipe to the AvantGarde, the Communist publication which boasts of 75,000 readers. Significantly enough-when compared to AngloSaxon publications for the young-detective stories alone are barred.

Women Can Talk Too And, though lacking the vote, let us not suppose that the young women of France are backward in expressing their views and aims, La Jeune Fine de France has for its objects the development of the heart and imagination and deals with the charitable and social work in general accomplished by the young women of the rising generation.

Maybe the readers of the CATHOLIC HERALD will express their ideas and preferences with regard to French and other foreign broadcasts so that the summary of foreign broadcasts on political, dramatic, literary subjects in this column may be devoted to items of particular interest to them.

How unique the opportunities for the study of foreign languages by radio are was illustrated recently by the case of a young Austrian of 21, educated at Frankfort and proficient in 10 languages, all of which acquired by listening to broadcasts. So perfect was his French, Spanish and Italian that he was mistaken for a native of these lands. The only language in which he had a strong German accent was English-which he had learnt from an English master in Germany!

All Things to All Men Whether then the listeners' taste lie in the direction of drama, he will have at his disposal transmissions of plays by the great classics of ancient and modern times, rendered by eminent artists from the Comedic Francaise, the Odion, the Art et Travail companies. There are lectures from the Sorbonne and talks on books on science, on music, on art, on every conceivable subject in fact, from Radio Paris, Paris P.T.T. and numbers of other stations.

Never surely has there been such a chance to equip one's mind for every phase and eventuality of life, while sitting by one's fireside! And to listen to foreign broadcasts in these days of stark materialism is to escape for a while from a world of turmoil and strife to the realm of "The queen of far away."




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