Page 2, 11th October 1935

11th October 1935
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Page 2, 11th October 1935 — The Week's News
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The Week's News

AT HOME

The Duchess of Kent gave birth to a son at her London home, 3, Belgrave Square, early on Wednesday morning.

National revenue for the first five days of October amounted to £14,479,940, which is £2,237,931 more than the comparable six days of 1934; the deficit for the period was £11,616,215, competed with e.15,493,883.

Within .the next few weeks the Board -If Trade will issue the first licences for the sinking of oil-wells in this country.

The Potato Marketing Board's quota marketing operations were strongly criticised at the conference of fish-friers at Sheffield on Saturday.

A permanent agricultural bureau to deal with the serious farming crisis, which is said to be affecting 70,000,000 persons, was advocated by the International Parliamentary Conference in London; plans to make it easier for individuals to sue in foreign countries were also discussed.

Up till Saturday last ten days' normal rain had fallen in six hours in part of south-eastern England.

Preliminary employment estimates reveal that there will be a further decline in unemployment figures to be published in the near future.

Steel manufacturers are to discuss measures for preventing newcomers from 'entering the industry.

The royal command performance at the London Palladium, on October 29, will not be broadcast this year.

Spinning-mills in Lancashire are busier than at any time since 1927; production has risen to 85 per cent. of its full capacity.

Coal output in Great Britain for the week ended September 21 totalled 4,363,100 tons with 745,600 workers against 4,174,500 tons with 747,100 workers in the previoes week.

London Passenger Transport Board receipts for the week before last totalled £556,300; an increase of £10,200 on the corresponding week of last year.

A national " keep-fit " campaign will be begun in London on Friday (to-day) at a conference representing the chief volune tary organisations concerned in postschool recreative physical training.

ABROAD

After three days' fighting the Italians entered Adowa at 10.30 a.m.• on Sunday morning last.

Austria. Hungary have revolted against th League's decision to issue economic eimetions. Both governments claim that their' friendship with Italy must be placed before their League obligations.

The Prime Minister of Belgium declared that his government remained faithful to the covenant of the League of Nations and the Locarno pact.

Gold to the value of 17,000,000 francs was shipped • from Cherbourg to New, York on Wednesday of last week.

The Mining Unions joint executive in South Afrip • held a prolonged meeting as a preliminary of last Friday's conference With the cabinet committee.

The Prime Minister of Bulgaria revealed that the aim of the conspirators against the government—exposure of whose plans led to the proclamation of martial

law— was the assassination of the King and Queen and the ,principal ministers,

A commercial treaty has been signed between Italy end Spain.

No more war supplies are to go from the United States of America either to Italy or to Abyssinia. President Roosevelt has directed Mr. Cordell Hull, Secretary of State, to issue the embargo proclamation.

The German press is with one accord refraining from expressing an opinion regarding the Italo-Abyssinian war.. .

A motion opposing participation in any war "except in defence of Australia or at the will of the people " was passed in Australia by the Labour party.




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