Page 2, 15th March 1946

15th March 1946
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Page 2, 15th March 1946 — THE KNOX TRANSLATION
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THE KNOX TRANSLATION

From the Abbot of Downside. SIR,—I note in THE Caniouc HERALD, published to-day, an

article by Dom Theodore Wessel

ing. Ile states therein that he holds no brief for the new team which is setting about translating the Bible and that all he knows about it is that its headquarters are at Downside. I should like to point out that as tar as I am aware no such team exists, nor is there any idea of getting together a team for translating the Bible pith headquarters at Downside Fr Wesseling complains of the numerous Catholic laity and clergy who resent every kind of high standard in religious thingsIt would help towards attaining the high standard which he seeks if he took pains to guarantee the accuracy of his statements when writing in the Catholic Press.

R. S. TRAFFORD.

Downside Abbey. Stratton-on-theFosse, nt. Bath.

SIR,-Secmingly no one as yet has mentioned the impressive fact that two notable cradlesCatholics urged our taking over the Authorised Version, correcting it where need be: those two were Cardinal Gasquet and Mgr, Wm. Barry. Our greatest need to-day is to make contacts where we can with the non-Cstholic Christians of this land; and our supreme opportunity would lie in using the Authorised Version, for the N.T.; the P.B. matter for the psalms; and the R.V. for the Old Testament. The P.B. psaltcr is eminently singnhle. To multiply new versions is admirable for interpretation purposes, but for misaiottai y simply disastrous. Then why cannot we take over the modern Englishman's Te Deur', -the noble " 0 God, our help in ages past," and such hymns as Abide with me " ? These are pert and parcel of English religious life, and we dismay and disappoint our countrymen by boycotting things touching his deepest sentiments to the quick. Isolationism in non-essentials as effectively blocks the reconversion of England as the categories of scholasticism block the conversion of the mystically-minded peoples of India, as Mgr. Goodier affirmed. I do not wish to be flippant —I am offering an, illustration only— but just as Noes ark has no place in English nurseries and toyshops, so has no version of Scripture any place in cross-words save the A.V. The point is, we isolate ourselves from the daily life of our race. We, are as men who talk to ourselves—we who were bidden to take the Gospel to every race and person!

vix.

Sta,—The Douai Version was written in what was at the time (the 16th century) modern English.

Therefore those who want to preserve as much as possible of the 16th century English in our modern Bible are not following the principles of the 16th century church, but are clinging to the outward founts of those times.

If these people had been alive in the 16th century, they would have wanted as much as possible of the language of King Alfred's version to be preserved in the Douai Version.

J. W. ADKINS.

56, Griffin Road, London, S.E.18.

THE MENTALLY SICK

Ste,--Convineed that the Editor and readers of THB CATHOLIC HERALD are keen to practise, as far as they can, the Seven Spiritual and Corporal Works of Mercy, I ask permission to plead for a little more exercise of those good works on behalf of some of our " forgotten " brothers and sisters.

My plea is for sufferers from nervous mental disorders, who are often almost forgotten even by their own relatives. Physically sick people are rarely left without visitors; some mentally gick patients rarely or ever share in the comfort and encouragement from Our Lord's words: " I was sick and ye visited Me."

The writer of this letter is one of those fortunate sufferers who (DG-) has regained health after a short time in a State mental hospital. It was sad beyond description to see " forgotten" patients on visiting days. The majority were visited frequently and ladened with extras and delicacies. The others felt it so keenly having no visitors or gifts. No words of mine could convey the beneficial results to many patients derived from the visit of a cheerful relative or friend.

To those Catholics enjoying health of mind and body I would offer the following remarks:

(1) Visit your relative or friend in a mental hospital frequently.

(2) Write regularly if you cannot manage frequent visits.

(3) If you have time and opportunity and you want to do a great act of charity, visit the nearest mental hospital and enquire about Catholics or other patients who have no visitor and are well enough to see one.

(4) Do everything in your power to speed on the time when poor Catholics can get mental rest and treatment in a Catholic hospital.

EX-PAT1ENT.

IRELAND AND FOOD

Sig,—I ani a practising Catholic (as my family has been for generations) and a great grandson of the Liberator. I was very interested to read in your issue of February 15 of the plethora of food enjoyed by Eire and the smug comments of your Special Correspondent. And then out of the grease comes the sting, " Force the six counties into union with Eire and as a reward you shall share our plenty."

Should the Six Counties wish for union with the full-fed South and severance with that England with whom they nobly took their part in the fight for the liberty of the world, there would be no hindrance by Britain. But that we should force our brothers into a hateful union at the call of our bellies is monstrous. The Counties fought with us and suffered with us while the South wallowed in its neutrality that cost us so dear in treasure and ships and blood.

I loved Ireland in defeat and oppression, she was the dear island of dreams. Prosperous and holding out bribes of fat meats she is flyblown and blowsy and slightly smelly.

Please do not publish my name or Regiment.

X.

THE GESTAPO MANTLE

Sia,-Has the mantle of the Gestapo fallen upon our military authorities ? I mean the method of reporting sermons. 1 know of one case where an interpreter was sent to report upon the sermons delivered at a Catholic and a Lutheran service. May I express my disgust at the above ?

Y. C. W.




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