Page 11, 16th December 1938

16th December 1938
Page 11
Page 11, 16th December 1938 — Cardinal MacRory Leads Joint Christian Movement
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Locations: DUBLIN, Belfast

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Cardinal MacRory Leads Joint Christian Movement

APOSTOLIC BLESSING TO CATHOLICS WHO ASSIST

From Our Own Correspondent DUBLIN.

IRELAND HAS RISEN IN AID OF THE VICTIMS OF RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION ON THE CONTINENT. HEADED BY THE CARDINAL PRIMATE, THE LEADERS OF RELIGION HAVE FORMED AN IRISH CO-ORDINATING COMMITTEE FOR THE RELIEF OF CHRISTIAN REFUGEES FROM CENTRAL EUROPE.

The Committee has issued a moving appeal for funds. The first signatory is Cardinal MacRory; the other Catholic Archbishops, and the only Protestant Archbishop, Dr. Gregg, of Dublin, follow, together with other eeclesiasties and a notable list of eminent laymen, Catholic and Protestant.

Here is the text of the appeal: " There are in Europe to-day many thousands of Christians who have lost everything except their Faith. Their suffering is rendered peculiarly bitter by the fact that they have nowhere to go. Other European countries which have already taken thousands of these unfortunates will take no more. Ireland has so far taken a very small number and should now do her share.

" This Appeal Committee has been formed under the chairmanship of the Ceann Comhairle, Mr F. Fahy, T.D., to collect and administer funds. The Government of Eire has agreed to facilitate us in every way in our task. Action on the following lines is proposed: " 1. Reception and agricultural training of a group made up on the one hand of family units, and on the other of vigorous young men with a view to their subsequent emigration to the British Dominions and South American countries.

" 2. The admission of a limited number of refugees, adults or children, to be received by families in Ireland until arrangements can be made for their emigration to some other country.

" The mere relief of these broken people is not enough. We intend to train them for a new life; to provide them with a genuine hope of becoming useful citizens in the country of their destination.

" The success of our plans depends on the generosity of the people of Ireland. Money is the urgent need; but offers of hospitality for children and adults, and contributions of furniture or other goods for the proposed agricultural settlements will help us in our task. In the case of children under 16 hospitality for the holiday periods will make it easier for the COMmittee to place the children in boarding schools throughout the country.

" In former days when the great Famine and other disasters lay heavy on this land, many of our people sought and received the hospitality of other countries. Let us now show that we, too, can be generous and prove to the world that the Irish people still believe that Christians of whatever race or blood are sons of the same Father whose brotherhood is shown, above all, in this, that they love one another.'"

Senator Sir John Keane, baronet, the leader of Southern ex-Unionists, who is a signatory, has opened his summer residence in County Waterford to refugees, and some Austrian Catholics are installed already.

The Jews are represented on the

Committee : and presumably relief

will be extended to Jews as well as to the Christian refugees who are specified in the appeal.

The Bishop of Down and Connor has led an associated movement in Belfast.

Asylum in Ireland

Once again Ireland extends her hospitality M eufferers from intolerance in other lands. In the fifth and sixth centuries her schools were built up by refugees from Gaul. In the time of Queen Mary Catholic Ireland gave a home to Protestant refugees from England.

In the seventeenth century Huguenots and Jewe came to Ireland— the Huguenots to build whole towns, and the Jews to people the district now called Fairview. Scottish Covenanters found refuge in Ulster and built up the linen trade.




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