Page 1, 18th August 1939

18th August 1939
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Page 1, 18th August 1939 — ED FOR CALM COURAGE
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Locations: Birmingham, Vienna, ROME

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ED FOR CALM COURAGE

ITEMS FROM THE NEWS: Beriin Nuncio Reports to Pope : European Situation Worries Vatican: Nazis Want to Oust Cardinal Innitzer

THIS WEEK THERE HAS BEEN A LULL IN THE STORM OF INTERNATIONAL TENSION. REPORTS FROM DANZIG SPEAK OF A RENEWAL OF NEGOTIATIONS BETWEEN THE DANZIG NAZI LEADER AND POLAND.

THE PAPAL NUNCIO IN GERMANY, MGR. ORSENIGO, IS IN ROME.

He had a long interview with the Pope and is understood to have made a full report on the international situation as seen through German eyes. Also, he gave an account of the state of the Church in Germany.

It is considered in the Vatican that the Nazi oppression of the Church is on the increase, writes our Vatican City Correspondent.

The Vatican semi-official newspaper, Osservatore Romano, has resumed its former practice of reporting fully Nazi outrages against the Church, and answering Nazi Press attacks against the Faith.

The position of Cardinal Innitzer, Archbishop of Vienna, is causing increasing anxiety.

It is believed that the German authorities are pressing for his recall.

The Pope, in his summer retreat at Castel Gandolfo is watching closely the trend of affairs.

Not only has he anxieties over Germany, but also, although at the moment there is a lull, the Vatican considers the present international situation to be dangerous and delicate in the extreme.

" It seems that matters have now passed from the stage of Press polemics and entered that of diplomatic and military moves . . . It is impossible to consider this situation . . . without anxiety," writes the " Osservatore Romano," semi-official Vatican newspaper.

In this atmosphere, and amidst these anxieties, it is believed that the Pope is preparing the first Encyclical of his reign.

There is no need to emphasise to Catholics that the Pope in this Encyclical will deal strictly with faith and morals, though it is likely that the application of Catholic principles to international affairs will be before his mind.

On this and other pages are reports of hate, indifference, propaganda, fear, and distrust, from all quarters of the globe.

Japanese children are to be taught to hate Britain (page 3), Hungary fears German moves against her (page '7), the armies and navies of Europe will in a week or two be at full strength.

• At such a time the ordinary Catholic can do nothing better than follow the Pope's example and pray that the hearts and minds of Europe's statesmen may be enlightened.

Panic and scares at such a time are useless.

The harm done by "scare " headlines and posters in the national Press is commented on by Douglas Jerrold (page 6).

The ever-present and easily-forgotten necessity for finding some constructive plan to lead Europe out of the present impa.sse is emphasised in an editorial article on the same page.

Finally, anxiety over foreign affairs must not distract attention from the anxious problems facing us at home.

With prices rising, labour troubles are on the increase (page 7).

On page 3 Sir Patrick Hannon, Catholic Conservative M.P. for the Molesey division of Birmingham, gives his views on our present social and financial problems in a special interview with J. L. Benvenisti.




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