Page 4, 18th January 1957

18th January 1957
Page 4
Page 4, 18th January 1957 — DOUGLAS HYDE'S COLUMN
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Locations: London, Sunderland

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DOUGLAS HYDE'S COLUMN

„„The Bathbuilders' Union

EVERYONE attending a Catholic Social Guild week-end school at the Corby Hall, Sunderland, on February 2 and 3 will be enrolled as a member of the Bathbuilders' Union.

"The Red Army in Great Britain" is the general title of this out-of-the-ordinary residential weekend school which is being organised by the C.S.G.'s very lively Tyneside and District branch.

It sounds somewhat sensational, perhaps, but the event will clearly be very practical and worthwhile. Titles of the various sessions include "Know your enemy," ,,Know your strength," " What makes a Commie tick? ", " The Bathbuilders' Association."

"At each session," James

Quigley, the secretary, tells me,

there will be " an authentic simulation of the subject, presented in dramatic form." The "Bathbuilders' Association" session, for example, will be modelled on a trade union meeting. The agenda used will he an exact copy of one already drawn up for an actual trade union meeting.

The newly-enrolled members of the "union" will have among them three who will take the part of Communists and who, I understand, confidently believe that they will be able to get their resolutions adopted. This is because, in the best Communist tradition, they are likely to know more about trade union procedure and committee work than anyone else present. They also believe that they will be able to get their nominees elected to office.

Their resolutions will follow exactly the lines of Communist ones which have already been carried in various trade union branches.

But the school has its positive side. There will be demonstrations of a novel and original nature to show what Catholics can do to bring Christ into Britain's industrial life. Just three years ago this same branch of the C.S.G. organised a somewhat similar event. It was a great success on that occasion. I hope it will be this time, too.

Look Out

TRADE union branches are being A circularised by various funds

th

organised for e purpose of bringing relief to the heroic people of Hungary. Catholics and others who detest Communism are likely to be among the most energetic in raising cash for this cause. Such people should be warned that the " British Fund for the Hungarian Red Cross," which is appealing to unions for money, is controlled by the British-Hungarian Friendship Society, a body proscribed by the Labour Party because of its Communist COMM The secretary of the fund has officially and publicly endorsed the Communist Party's policy in Hungary. Money collected for this organisation is likely to finish up in the hands of the bitter enemies of the very people whom most British trade unionists want to help.

Effective

A REALLY damaging piece of k ammunition for e fight against Communism in the trade unions and factories is "The Peril in Our Midst," a very courageous little hook by Woodrow Wyatt, which is published by Phoenix House.

In it the author tells you which unions the Communists dominate or are currently attempting to capture. He also gives factual details of Communist vote-rigging and fraudulent practices, providing names of unions and actual branches where this has happened. The Electrical Trades Union and the Fire Brigades Union, as one would expect (since the Communists for years have dominated both) come in for close examination. So too does the Amalgamated Engineering Union, which the Communists are busily engaged in trying to capture at this moment. Copies may be obtained for 2s. post free from Industrial and Research Information Services Ltd.,

404 Maritime House, Clapham,

London, S.W.4, Solvent

IF you have a Communist friend who is disturbed about recent events in Hungary, lend him "Hungarian Tragedy," by Peter Fryer (Dennis Dobson, 5s.). The author was until recently a reporter on the Daily Worker and an active Communist Party tutor, engaged in his spare time in teachMg Marxist philosophy to the members. Then, when the fighting in Hungary began, his editor sent him out to report the situation. He did. But his indignant despatches were not published by his paper. They were too critical of the Soviet Union, too wholeheartedly on the side of the Hungarian people. He resigned his job and was in due course expelled from the Communist Party. He still writes as a Communist but as a fiercely disillusioned one. It will not be easy for Communist Party members to explain away what he writes.

Disillusioned

wHAT seemed to me to be THE CATHOLIC HERALD'S most promising headline last week proved, on closer examination, to be not quite as exciting as at first appeared. It was " Speed Nun's Cause." Perhaps it was our use of the term "speed cop" and that one so often secs American nuns pictured as doing anything from driving cars to ice skating that made me imagine for a moment that a motor racing nun was on the way to canonisation. But the first sentence which began: " Five Indian Christian M.P.s have asked the Holy Father for the speedy beatification of an Indian nun ..." soon disillusioned me. Pity,




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