Page 3, 19th February 1965

19th February 1965
Page 3
Page 3, 19th February 1965 — Manchester plan must wait for finance
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Organisations: Link Society
People: PETER OKELL
Locations: Manchester, Salford

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Manchester plan must wait for finance

By PETER OKELL

AMOVE by a number of Catholic guilds and associations in the Manchester area for the building of a centre to serve the Catholic community has been turned down by Bishop Holland of Salford on the grounds that finance for the project could not be found at this time.

In a letter to Bishop Holland, the Link Society, supported by more than 20 Catholic bodies, had suggested setting up a committee to look into the possibility of establishing a centre and launching an appeal for funds.

The proposed centre. first discussed back in the 1920s, was intended as a permanent meetingplace for Catholic organisations, many of whom are finding difficulty in renting suitable halls and committee rooms in Manchester, due not only to their scarcity but the high rents charged.

It was also intended that the building would serve as a meetingplace for young Catholics. Concern has been expressed at the high "leakage rate" among schoolleavers and it was thought that a central meeting-place would keep these youngsters more closely in touch with the Church.

In his letter Bishop Holland acknowledged the advantages which could come from a centre of the type proposed, but he said it could not be undertaken at present in view of the many other projects straining the diocesan resources. Costs for the establishing of the new Centre had been put at about £300,000.




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