Page 4, 22nd March 1946

22nd March 1946
Page 4
Page 4, 22nd March 1946 — IN A FEW WORDS
Close

Report an error

Noticed an error on this page?
If you've noticed an error in this article please click here to report it.

Tags

Locations: Dublin, Rome, London, Edinburgh

Share


Related articles

Sutton Education Meeting Showed Difference Between N.u.t....

Page 1 from 16th April 1943

Chuter Ede (educ. Pad. Sec.)

Page 1 from 12th February 1943

Government Wants Fair Play In Catholic Schools Question

Page 1 from 22nd April 1943

School Negotiations Go On Chuter Ede On Illogical English

Page 1 from 3rd December 1943

Adoption Makes Way For

Page 7 from 29th October 1954

IN A FEW WORDS

Chuter Ede's Joke I MUST congiatulate Mr. Clutter Ede. the Horne Secretary (a charming and just man whom Catholics found most approachable when he was second-up in the Education Ministry during the Education Bill days), on the way he handled the Albert Hall Vigilantes meeting. By reading a long anti amusing report of the whole affair by an " observer " he had the whole House of Commons laughing, except, of course, for a few dry old sticks like Mr. Driberg. I had felt worried by the evidence of open Communist intention to make a row in defiance of any decent order, still less, of course, any free speech, but I confess that the Home Secretary's tactics of reducing the whole thing to a joke at the expense of the Communists was the wisest way of handling it. It's the best thing that hashappened since Mr. Pritt was induced to take part in a B.B.C. debate on how to deal with our so-called Fascists.

Catholic F.R.S.'s A READER asks me talievidence • ". that the Church is not unrepresented in the scientific field. I sin glad. cif the question because, talking to a member of the Newman Association the other day, I learnt that there are no less than nine Catholic Fellows of the Royal Society. I thought there were: only two or three. Here arc their names: Professor A. J. Allmand, M.C., N.R.S. (London), Professor A. W. Conway, F.R.S. (University College, (Dublin), Dr. R. G. Hatton, C.B.E., IhR.S. (East Mailing Research Station), Professor B. McSwiney, Fere S. (London), Professor H. S. 'holm,

(Princeton University, U.S.A.), Professor G. Temple, F.R.S. (London, King's College), Dr. W. R. Thompson. F.R.S. (Ontario, Canada). Professor Sir Edmund Whittaker, F.R.S. (Professor of Mathematics, Edinburgh), Professor Eccles, F.R.S. (Otago, Australia). The Vatican Pontifical Academy of Sciences returns the compliment by 'electing non-Catholic members. Sir Alexander Fleming, as we reported last week, has just been elected.

Foyle's Talks

WAS unable to get along to my

friend George Glasgow's talk: " Why I Became a Catholic," at the Initial meeting of the Foyle's Bookshop talks on Fridays at 1.15, but I heard it was delightful. The room was full, the atmosphere informal and the business prompt. The Legion of Mary are the organisers. One wishes, however, that these " convert " series (Pamela Frankau is next) could attract mainly non-Catholics. To make this possible some adveitisement outside the Catholic papers is desirable. and I should have thought that a silver collection would have met the cost.

Cardinal's Wit LIKE the story which appears in this week's Time about the late Cardinal Glennon's first trip in an aeroplane. It seems the Cardinal was a little undecided about the proposed visit to Rome for the consistories and as a rehearsal took a trial hop in a plane &routed St Louis. As be gazed from the window of the aircraft, overhearing the pilot exclaim how deeply honoured he was by carrying such a distinguished passenger, the Cardinal drily observed: " It will be an even greater honour if you bring him down again." His dignity of manner and his modesty are underlined in a remark of a friend recorded in the same journal : " Those who do hot know him are never in danger of mistaking his rank and those who do know him are never reminded of it." In the statistical fashion beloved of the American press. Time records that the Cardinal during his episcopate, ordained 4,700 young men to the priesthood and consecrated seven bishops; he celebrated Holy Mass 22,000 times and confirmed 225,000 Catholics. He was a very bitter opponent of the wave of gangsterism that engulfed the United States after the last war and on one occasion refused to permit Christian burial for a murdered gangster.

Constructive Criticism

1SS Doris Burton, the ardent and

tireless convert from the Oxford Group (whence she has learnt many a trick of effective propaganda), writes to me about thc B.B.C. Family Relationships programme which I have been discussing. She tells me that she wrote a strong letter of protest after two or three of the broadcasts and said, that unless • the Christian argument was put forward at the same time, these neo-pagan talks would be destructive to national morality rather than constructive. In fact, the last talk (the

one I have referred to) did end with

the Christian point of view. That seems to me a really constructive form of criticism, and I am glad she takes the same view as I do that it is better to plead for good Christian contributions than to protest against such programmes altogether. " I am always wishing that representatives of the Y.C.W., the Grail, etc., were represented in these public talks," she says. The explanation probably is that the , relevant B.B.C. department has never heard of these. Perhaps Fr. Agnellus Andrew could help?

Papers for the Troops I AM asked to remind readers that I there is still need of money for the " Papers for the Troops " fund. This fund. it will be remembered, was established to enable this paper to be sent to the Forces abroad at a cheaper rate. Thousands of our serving airmen. sailors and soldiers have been enabled through it to see the paper, if not regularly, at least from time to time. Now the scheme is being confined to the more distant zone—C.M.F., Iraq, India, etc., where troops are badly in need of reading matter to while away duller days. I need hardly say more, except that chaplains constantly write to beg us to maintain supplies. If yoa csin help this fund, do send anything, however small, to the " Papers for the Troops fund, CATHOLIC HERALD, 67, Fleet Street, London, E.C.4 JOTTER

" Believe roe, there ' are no two greater friends in the world than

Vyshinsky and myself." — M rnest Bevin.




blog comments powered by Disqus