Page 14, 24th August 1935

24th August 1935
Page 14
Page 14, 24th August 1935 — COMFORT on the TENNIS COURT
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COMFORT on the TENNIS COURT

WOMEN naturally like to look their best on the tennis court. Green lawns or hard courts, blue sk ics and slinky tennis frocks make a fascinating setting fzr good looks.

Use

Oiumeal

But not even a beauty queen could look well if her face and arms had been allowed to grow red and puffy through exposure to a too fierce sun, her hair bleached and robbed of its natural oils, and her hands and feet blistered through wielding the racket and running about.

If the skin has the slightest tendency to sensitiveness, it is an excellent plan to give up the use of soap on the face. Use little bags of fine oatmeal which will soften the water and provide sufficient lather for cleansing the skin. Do not put cream on the face just before going into the sunshine. Cream heavily at night to keep the skin soft and well nourished, but use no more than a protective lotion and a dusting of powder during the day.

Calamine Pack

Calamine lotion should be kept in the beauty cupboard, for there is nothing quite so soothing as a calamine pack for a skin that is overheated. Cleanse the face, soak a large piece of cotton wool in the lotion, place it on the sensitive part, and dip it again in the lotion as soon as it loses its coolness.

Hair Care

Hair that easily bleaches in the sunshine can be helped by having slightly warmed olive oil rubbed well into the roots an hour before it is shampooed. After the shampoo pour a little thin brilliantine into the palm of the hand, run the bristles of the hair-brush through the oil and fiimly brush the hair so that it can be induced to lie naturally without showing any trace of grease.

Rub the palms of the hands with a little methylated spirit and they will not grow tender so quickly as if left unprotected, and the soles of the feet will harden sufficiently under the same treat




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