Page 2, 24th November 1972

24th November 1972
Page 2
Page 2, 24th November 1972 — Crosby priests back all-in schools
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Crosby priests back all-in schools

From BART HARRINGTON in Liverpool

FULL support for moves to introduce compre

hensive education to Crosby, has been given in a joint statement from the priests of the deanery.

At the second well-attended meeting of the Crosby Catholic Parents for Comprehensive Education — it now has more than 1,400 members — the secretary, Mr. Tony Redmond. read a statement which said: "The priests of the deanery are united in seeking the complete abolition of II plus selection for Catholic children desiring places in Catholic senior schools.

"They urge that the consequent comprehensive organisation of our Catholic senior schools consistent with the efficient Catholic education

of the children, according to age. ability and aptitude be introduced at the very first opaims should be porTtuhneistye.

,pursued through the friendly and whole-hearted co-operation Of all who are concerned with Catholic education in the area and have the best interests of our children at heart."

The statement has therefore clarified the position of the deanery priests and fully endorses the statements of Archbishop reorganisation ofB thesecondaryt h

at education system for Catholics and the consequent abolition of the 11 plus are urgent if the Catholic schools system is to be in line with the State system in the area.

A fully comprehensive struc

ture was introduced for them in September last. One of the Catholic direct-grant schools, St. Mary's College for Boys. while agreeing in principle with the Catholic proposals, eventually found itself unable to enter the scheme because of site difficulties in providing ac

commodation for nonacademic courses, and the whole scheme had therefore to he withdrawn.

Mr. Redmond now affirms that his association intends to set up its own working party to decide what it considers to be the best possible scheme in the light of all the present circumstances. "We are approaching the head teachers and the archdiocese asking them to make information available to us." he said.




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