Page 6, 25th November 1955

25th November 1955
Page 6
Page 6, 25th November 1955 — ALL SORTS By Fr. Bernard
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ALL SORTS By Fr. Bernard

Starts an Basset, S.J.

ALL SAINTS

COMPETITION

NOTICE has already been given in another place of the Saints competition, due to start in this column next week.

It will be a three-week contest.

The questions are simple and straightforward, demanding no very high siandard of erudition, with one or two testing enquiries to divide the sheep from the goats.

These competitions about the Saints are best done by a group of people together, for we cannot hope to know enough of all the Saints by ourselves.

Previous competitions of this kind have brought in family answers and also answers from religious communities.

All the answers can be fitted on a postcard and the cards will have to be in within five days.

Look out for the first set of questions next week.

WORTH

IT was a joy to hear that plans are now well under way for the building of a church at Worth Priory. It is to be shaped like a Greek cross with the altar in the centre. The choir will be behind the altar, the school in front of it and, in the two transepts, will be places for staff, retreatants and visitors. A retreat house is also planned. £6,000 has already been given towards the £25,000 which will be needed for the completion of the work. Readers may be moved to contribute to this splendid scheme. The conversion of England may well come through the multiplication ot monasteries. More active missionary work prepares the way, but the full life of the Church will not he known and appreciated until there are monastic centres in every county and in every town. We are witnessing the beginnings of this development and should not be slow to play our part in it. A century from mow England will be covered with monasteries and the long centuries of missionary endeavour will have born its fruit.

RETREAT HOUSES

THE news of a possible retreat house at Worth in the not-too-distant future is encouraging for all who have the interests of the retreat movement at heart. The late Fr. Charles Plater was thought to be a mild fanatic when at the turn of the century he opened near Manchester his first retreat house for men. The Cenacle communities with their retreat houses for women also seemed a little unusual. Tcsday the retreat movement is very well established and many orders have furthered the work of these pioneers. Last sear with some trepidation Southwell House was opened as the first retreat house for men in London, and it has more than justified itself. We still have week-ends with small, disappointing numbers, hut often enough bookings stretch months ahead. This week-end the house is fully booked by the Legion of Marv; next week it is crammed to the doors for a Sodality retreat. On December 3 and 4 a very large number is expected for a study week-end on automation organised by the Catholic Social Guild.

THE FIRST FRIDAY VIGIL

111HE next First Friday vigil

-Iat Southwell House falls on Thursday, December 1. This is a happy day for the Holy Hour for the conversion of England, for Campion. Sherwin and Briant died on December 1 at. Marble Arch. In recent months 30 to 40 people come for the First Friday vigil. Supper is at 7.30 p.m. and the Holy Hour starts at 8.20 p.m. Men who want may stay in the house and have Mass on the First Friday at any convenient hour to get them to work in time. The cost is 3s. for supper, 7s. for a room and two meals. Notice must be given in advance.

TAILPIECE

A.,VERY small girl on her first day at school was asked her name. She kept saying Margaret. but would not give a surname. Said the teacher patiently, " Now dear, what is your father's name?" " Daddy." said the little girl, "I know." said the teacher, " hut he must have another name as well; what does Murnmic call him? " " She doesn't call him anything," said the little girl, "she loves him."




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