Page 2, 30th March 1951

30th March 1951
Page 2
Page 2, 30th March 1951 — ANTI-SEMITISM
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ANTI-SEMITISM

Prejudices combated

StR,-I have read the letters on anti-semitism recently published in your columns with interest and some concern. Without entering into detailed comment may I make three general observations.

In the first place, anti-Semitism which in current usage signifies antipathy to everyone and everything Jewish. purely on the ground of being Jewish and without regard to individual merits or demerits. is an extreme case of the kind of group prejudice which is almost invariably symptomelk of some deep-seated fear or disorder in the life of the community as a whole.

Secondly. the existence ol such group prejudice is a constant menace. not only to the security. of the group against which it is directed, but also to the well-being of the group entertaining the prejudice. That the exploitation by the Nazis of a prejudice against Jews brought ttnprecedented disaster on-European Jewry is common knowledge. What is not so generally recognised is the extent to which the German people as a whole suffered on account of this exploitation.

Thirdly. may I remind your readers of the existence in this country of a Council of Christians and Jews whose function it is to combat just such prejudice as this by the promotion of mutual understanding and goodwill between Christians and Jews, and the fostering of cooperation in civic and social service. The Council. which enjoys the support of the religious leaders of all sections both of the Christian and Jewish communities, seeks to emphasise the extent of the common ground between them-always with proper respect for differencesin the face of present attempts in Eastern Europe and elsewhere to undermine the spiritual foundations of both Judaism and Christianity.

Wu I lAst W. SIMPSON. General Secretary.

Council of Christians and Jews. 162a Strand. W.C2.

SLIGHTLY MAD?

Si.-The disagreeable fact is that in Europe and the United States some otherwise estimable people are, on this subject, slightly mad. Their minds are captivated by morbid fantasies in which Jewish capitalists, Communists. Freemasons, editors. film stars, old-clothes men, and what have you, are engaged in conspiracies of the Most fascinating kind.

It ought perhaps to be pointed out that there are other slightly mad people who have strikingly similar delusions about Catholicism, and still others, no doubt slightly madder. who think Jews and Catholics (sometimes, as with the Ku Klux Klan. negroes are thrown in as well) are engaged in the same conspiracy. Since it seems impracticable to subject such persons to exorcism-seriously. there is something devilish about the whole business-we can only pray for them.

J. M. CAMERON.

8 Ellercroft Avenue, Bradford. Yorks,




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