Page 9, 3rd March 1939

3rd March 1939
Page 9
Page 9, 3rd March 1939 — NEW EVIDENCE I OF NAZI POWER
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People: Ciano, Herr Hitler
Locations: Warsaw

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NEW EVIDENCE I OF NAZI POWER

Students' Demonstration Inspires Whole Country

ANTI-POLISH RIOTING BY GERMAN STUDENTS IN DANZIG HAS PRODUCED A WAVE OF ANTI-GERMAN DEMONSTRATIONS THROUGHOUT POLAND.

These have coincided with the visit to Warsaw of Count Ciano, Italian Foreign Minister, who has been cheered in the streets by crowds demonstrating against the other Axis Power, Germany.

The trouble in Danzig broke out in the Technical High School, the chief institution for higher education in Danzig.

This has now been closed temporarily, at the request of the Polish Commissioner-General.

The Polish authorities in the Free City have sent to the Danzig Senate (which has a Nazi majority) a list of proposals they recommend to clear up the trouble, and demand to secure the rights of Polish students at the High School.

Below, our correspondent in Danzig describes the beginning of the students' riots in Danzig and the Polish reply.

Front Our Own Correspondent DANZIG.

:A large political demonstration took place on Saturday in Gdynia as a protest against the attacks recently made on Polish students in Danzig.

For some time feeling has been bitter between Polish and German students in the Free City, and the Poles, being in the minority, have had to suffer many insults in the cafés and other public places.

The same treatment is not, however, accorded, to the Ukrainians, who, though Polish citizens, are allowed to fraternise with the Germans and, in many cases; after completing their studies go to Germany to do labour and military service.

"DOGS AND POLES"

Matters came to a head between the Germans and Poles a few days ago, when some German students hung a notice on the door of the

well-known Cafe Langfuhr which read: Hunden und Polen der Zutritt verboten" (Admission refused to dogs and Poles).

The Polish Students Union thereupon passed a resolution demanding equality of treatment for Poles and Germans in the Danzig Technical High School. and the matter was brought up in the Polish Sejrn by a delegate of the name of Dudzinski.

The "Danziger Vorposten" replied by stating that the Poles were guests who were allowed in Danzig only on sufferance.

EJECTED BY FORCE After that the German students decided to take action themselves. During a lecture on the subject of hydromechanics in the Technical High School an uproar was started, the lecturer was obliged to abandon any attempt to maintain order, and all Poles present were ejected by force from the lecture room. This was the signal for similar onslaughts in other parts of the High School, and eventually all Poles in the building were forced to take refuge and barricade themselves in a room on the third storey. The Germans thereupon produced battering-rams and broke down the door. The Poles were then passed down from hand to hand over the heads of a not inconsiderable crowd of Germans.

POLICE HELP RIOTERS The next day siege Was laid to the Polish Students' Home. Some four to five hundred Germans, mostly in the uniforms of the Hitler Youth and other National-Socialist organisations, surrounded the building and forced their way in. Before long police arrived and, sympathising with the assailants, saw fit to attack the Poles with bayonets and truncheons. Eight of the Polish students received serious injuries and were removed to hospital.

The Technical High School is the chief Institution for higher education in Danzig.

POLES COUNTER-DEMONSTRATE Some hundreds of Poles took part in the demonstration subsequently held in Gdynia. A member of the Polish Nationalist Party, wearing the Party's uniform of a blue beret, a light khaki shirt and black trousers, read through a megaphone an account of the events which had taken place in Danzig. He was frequently interrupted by cheering. Then, bare-headed, the crowd sang the Polish national anthem. Other patriotic songs followed, a section of the crowd holding their right arms out in the manner popularised by Herr Hitler, in order to demonstrate their loyalty to Poland.

It is customary for a political demonstration of some kind to be held in Gdynia on Sunday mornings. Similar demonstrations have been taking place in all other important Polish towns, and there have been scenes outside German consulates.




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