Page 7, 5th May 1950

5th May 1950
Page 7
Page 7, 5th May 1950 — Holy Year opening on records
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Organisations: Academy of St. Cecilia
Locations: Rome

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Holy Year opening on records

Four special Holy Year records, of exceptional interest to Catholics, have been published by His Master's Voice. They will bring the Holy Father's voice right into British homes.

It is hard to play this set of

eight sides (DB 21049-21052) without getting something of the thrill of the events of last Christmas Eve when the Pope inaugurated "The Year of Great Return."

The first record introducing the set gives the sound of the bells of the four Major Basilicas of Rome on one side, and the Pilgrim's Hymn sung by the polyphonic choir of the Academy of St. Cecilia on the other.

On the third side the actual ceremony of the opening of the Holy Door is commenced with the Pope

intoning the Veni Creator. The Sistine Choir takes up the hymn to the Holy Ghost and then quite clear and distinct come the Pope's hammer blows on the Holy Door as he demands admission.

The sounds of the removal of the door and the Pope saying the prayer Actiotzes Nostras (Prevent. Oh Lord) are followed (No. 4) by the Sistine Choir singing the Jubilate Den.

PAPAL BLESSING Very clearly and distinctly the Pope is then heard saying the prayer Deus qui per Moysen, after which he intones the Te Deum, No. 5 gives excerpts of the singing of the Te Mall', followed by the Apostolic Blessing, the sound of the trumpet hells and the applause and " Viva's " of the vast congregation.

The only criticism of the set is perhaps that this " applause," necessarily mushed, is unduly prolonged. No. 6 is devoted to the singing of the Pontifical March by the choir of St. Cecilia's, with a rousing band accompaniment.

If the set is played straight through, No. 8 should be heard before No. 7. On that the Pope says the Holy Year Prayer in Italian, with the beauty of emphasis and intonation of the language which is his native tongue. On No. 7, the Pope says the prayer in English. B. J. P.




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