Page 3, 6th July 1962

6th July 1962
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Page 3, 6th July 1962 — Parents' Choice
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The Pride Of Any

Page 3 from 3rd November 1961

Parents' Choice

HISTORY IS NOT BUNK

By Otto Herschan

history, the story part is iften neglected; this makes stodgy school subject. Dates, ; of Parliament, Battles, issinations and the Crown, nap junior history at the ex

of the mirror of everylife which would put these its into their proper perspeeand make them teak

fred Duggan, in Growing Up te Thirteenth Century (Faber, , has tried to do just that. He ; the decade of 1270 and ibes the everyday habits and of a variety of people in &fa social spheres. 'He takes par

ticular care with regard to the Church and the book should be especially welcome to Catholics. It Ls intended for schoolchildren from 12 upwards.

Giants

WHEN we are small anyone over five feet tends to be a giant little wander then that fairy tales abound with giants. To collect a variety of such tales in a book is one way of presenting well-known and less familiar legends, as in A Book of Giants, by Ruth Manning-Sanders, with drawings by Robin Jacques (Methuen, 18s.). The stories come from countries near and far, Georgia, Cornwall, Jutland and Germany, not forgetting the Irish Finn M'Coull. They will entertain children who have not reached the age of scoffing at the improbable.

Sports and Pastimes Through the Ages, by Peter Moss (Harrap, 21s.), is in itself an unusual subject for historic research and probably unique as an idea for a children's book. It will fascinate young and old, reminding us of bear-baiting, the yo-yo, the early amateur photographer and the music hail, and introducing sports and pastimes perhaps unheard of by the reader.

Engrossing

We are all familiar with Marie and Pierre Curie, but how many of us know that their daughter became an equally distinguished scientist, a winner of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry? Irene Curie married Frederic Joliot, also a distinguished scientist, and so emulated the famous partnership of her parents. Her life is the engrossing subject of She Lived for Science, by Robin McKown (Macmillan, 12s. 6d.) For those over ID. Small in size, but not in stature, is The Observer's Book of Sea and Seashore, compiled by I, 0. Evans (Fredk. Warne, 5s.). This is one of a pocket series and is the answer to the "Why", "Where", "How", "When" all the questions which are addressed to the parent when he hopes to relax at the seaside.




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