Page 5, 7th November 1952

7th November 1952
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Page 5, 7th November 1952 — 722-YEAR -OLD
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722-YEAR -OLD

LINK WITH FRIARS MINOR JUST 722 years after they first arrived in Nottingham and built a church outside the town walls on the banks of the Leen, the Friars Minor are to build a new Franciscan church at Blue Bell Hill.

The site has been bought and is used temporarily as a children's playground.

The church will replace a small school-chapel in Hunt Street which the friars took over from the Nottingham diocese, and will contain a stone from the pre-Reformation Franciscan church.

Christmas church

Catholics in the Humberstone Road district of Leicester arc expecting to celebrate Christmas in their first permanent building.

Their present church, St. Joseph's, was formed in 1938 out of a block of stable buildings.

The new building, which Bishop Ellis is expected to open on December 21, will accommodate some 300 people and is designed as a parish It will serve as a church until a new one can be erected.

The Bishop's idea

A converted stable with a shop counter for an altar should not serve as the parish church for Cleckheaton after next June. for on Saturday Bishop Heenan laid the foundation stone for a permanent church dedicated to Our Lady of Perpetual Succour.

"When I visited this parish last year," said the Bishop, "1 was horrified at the inadequacy of the existing church. I saw that there was ground alongside for a new church, and I urged the parishioners to start preparing it for building. By the end of the week the men were clearing the ground."

For 27 years the stable-church has served Cleckheaton. Six years ago it ceased being a Mass centre and became a parish.

Stapleford mission

Another new church for the Nottingham diocese was blessed and opened by Bishop Ellis on Sunday at Stapleford. Dedicated to Si. John the Baptist, the church, in Lombardic style seating 200. is named in memory of Bishop John McNulty. The Stapleford mission was the first to be started after he became Bishop of Nottingham.

A stone altar with an oak reredos and baldacchino fitted with concealed lighting have cost nearly £9,000.

The parish priest, Fr. Benjamin Choyee, celebrated High Mass in the presence of Bishop Ellis.

Notts' mass centre

A new Mass centre dedicated to Our Lady of the Rosary and the Holy Angels, has been established at East Leake, Nottingham, where extensive housing developments are taking place and a large factory has been b

Fr. Denis Horgan, of the Institute of Charity, will go from Loughborough each Sunday to say Mass in the village hall at 9.15 a.m.

After 400 years

For the first time since the Reformation the Mass has returned to Mythohnroyd, a town of 4,000 people near Hebden Bridge, Yorks.

Fr. John Buggy, parish priest of liebden Bridge, is to say Mass each Sunday in the home of Mr. and Mrs. McLoughlin. The sideboard is converted into an altar and vestments and vessels have been presented by Fr. Boggy.

Some 90 Catholics attend the new Mass centre. Some of them have to hear Mass from the hall of the house.

Brackley funds

After hearing Mass for several years in a private chapel, a riding school and a hired room successively, the Catholics of Brackley, Northants. are raising funds to build a church for which a site has already been acquired. Brackley is served from Buckingham by a Franciscan.

In Plymouth

It is hoped that work will start soon on a new church for Beaconfield, Plymouth, where services have been held for the past 12 years in the hall of St. Boniface's College.




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