Page 12, 9th December 1938

9th December 1938
Page 12
Page 12, 9th December 1938 — Katie Roche T HE most remarkable thing about this untroubled comedy of the Irish country is the 'acting.
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Katie Roche T HE most remarkable thing about this untroubled comedy of the Irish country is the 'acting.

Keywords: Conceit

Natalie Moya plays, or rather Is. Katie Roche, the impetuous uneducated girl who marries an egoistical architect much older than herself, but can't resist having games with the boys when she discovers that the architect is more amused than bemused by her. There is a great amount of interesting stuff in this girl who is by turn swept by feelings of laughter. stiff sanctity, lustihood, affection, and naive but obstinate pride. . She is the play, the rest of the characters revolve round her.

Patrick Boxill is Michael, who loved her before the architect came, but would not marry her through a somewhat doltish deference to his mother's bitter tongue. He is full of fire and subservience, recklessness and prudery.

The architect, whose name is Stanislaus (a bad point against him) is played by Oswald Skilbeck with such imagination and magnificent conceit, that one expects each moment that he will ascend into poetry. But the dialogue is for a play about the Irish country. curiously matter of fact, and once or twice (and only once or twice) embarassingly hackneyed.

TORCH PETER TIToMPSON.




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